Top ten edible mushrooms

Edible quality of mushrooms on list below depends on freshness of mushroom and cleaning and cooking process.
Eastern (Asian) and western (European & U.S.) diets determine (in part) which mushrooms are preferred and how they are cooked.
There are other choice mushrooms in addition to those below. These are only a selection of the best. All but a few can be found in North American mushroom field guides or in specialty markets or served in restaurants.

#1 - Amanita caesarea

Amanita caesarea
Amanita caesarea, Amanita caesarea
#1 - Amanita caesarea: More photos
Amanita caesarea Amanita caesarea

Amanita caesarea, commonly known in English as Caesar's Mushroom, is a highly regarded edible mushroom in the genus Amanita, native to southern Europe and North Africa. It has a distinctive orange cap, yellow gills and stem. Similar orange-capped species occur in North America and India. It was known to and valued by the Ancient Romans, who called it Boletus, a name now applied to a very different type of fungus.

#2 - Tuber Melanosporum

Truffle

Tuber Melanosporum (Truffle)

A truffle is the fruiting body of an underground mushroom; spore dispersal is accomplished through fungivores, animals that eat fungi. Almost all truffles are ectomycorrhizal and are therefore usually found in close association with trees. There are hundreds of species of truffles, but the fruiting body of some (mostly in the genus Tuber) are highly prized as a food. The 18th-century French gastronome Brillat-Savarin called these truffles "the diamond of the kitchen". Edible truffles are held in high esteem in French, Spanish, northern Italian and Greek cooking, as well as in international haute cuisine. The genome sequence of the Périgord black truffle was published in March 2010.

#3 - Boletus Edulis

Boletus Edulis
Boletus Edulis
#3 - Boletus Edulis: More photos
Boletus Edulis

Boletus edulis is considered one of the safest wild mushrooms to pick for the table, as there are no poisonous species that closely resemble it.[17] The most similar mushroom may be the devil's bolete (Boletus satanas), which has a similar shape, but has a red stem and stains blue on bruising. However, it is often confused with the very bitter and unpalatable Tylopilus felleus, but can be distinguished by the reticulation on the stalk; in porcini, it is a whitish net-like pattern on a brownish stalk, whereas it is a dark pattern on white in the latter. Porcini have whitish pores while the other has pink. If in doubt, tasting a tiny bit of flesh will yield a bitter taste.

#4 - Clitopilus prunulus

Clitopilus prunulus
Clitopilus prunulus
#4 - Clitopilus prunulus: More photos
Clitopilus prunulus

Clitopilus prunulus, commonly known as the miller or the sweetbread mushroom, is an edible pink-spored basidiomycete mushroom found in grasslands in Europe. It has a grey to white cap and decurrent gills.

#5 - Leucopaxillus lepistoides

Leucopaxillus lepistoides

Leucopaxillus is a genus of fairly large white-spored gilled mushrooms which are found worldwide growing on the ground in woodlands. These are saprotrophs, but may sometimes be ectomycorrhizal. Less than ten species of Leucopaxillus are known to grow in North America. No species of Leucopaxillus are known to be poisonous, but they do not have an appealing taste or texture. The widespread genus contains about 15 species.

#6 - Niscalus Lactarius

Niscalus Lactarius
Niscalus Lactarius
#6 - Niscalus Lactarius: More photos
Niscalus Lactarius

Lactarius sanguifluus is an edible species of fungus in the Russulaceae family. It is distributed in Asia and Europe. When bruised or cut, the fruit bodies ooze a blood-red to purple latex which turns greenish upon exposure to air. The caps are carrot to reddish-brown with darker concentric zones, and become funnel-shaped in age. Fruit bodies are found scattered or in groups under conifers, especially Douglas fir.

#7 - Craterellus cornucopioides

Craterellus cornucopioides
Craterellus cornucopioides
#7 - Craterellus cornucopioides: More photos
Craterellus cornucopioides

Craterellus cornucopioides is an edible mushroom, also known as trumpet of death, black chanterelle, black trumpet, or horn of plenty. The Cornucopia, in Greek mythology, referred to the magnificent horn of the goat (or goat of the nymph) Amalthea, that filled itself with whatever meat or drink its owner requested. It has become the symbol of plenty.
The mushroom is dark, almost black, and looks rather unattractive, but has a very good flavour. When dried its flavour even improves becoming quite like that of black truffle. It is hard to find because of its dark color, which easily blends in with the leaf litter on the forest floor. Hunters of this mushroom say it is like looking for black holes in the ground.

#8 - Macrolepiota procera

Macrolepiota procera
Macrolepiota procera
#8 - Macrolepiota procera: More photos
Macrolepiota procera

The parasol mushroom (Macrolepiota procera) is a basidiomycete fungus with a large, prominent fruiting body resembling a lady's parasol. It is a fairly common species on well-drained soils. It is found solitary or in groups and fairy rings in pastures and occasionally in woodland. Globally, it is widespread in temperate regions.
It is a very sought after and popular fungus in Europe, due in part to its large size, seasonal frequency and versatility in the kitchen.
The parasol mushroom is difficult to mistake for any other, especially in regions like eastern Europe where the poisonous look-alike Chlorophyllum molybdites does not occur. Nevertheless, as with picking any fungus for consumption, caution should be exercised at all times.
The parasol mushroom may be eaten raw. It is popular soaked in butter. Only the cap of fresh specimens is considered edible.
In central and eastern Europe countries this species of fungi is usually prepared similarly to a cutlet. It is usually run through egg and breadcrumbs and then fried on a pan with some oil or butter. Served with white bread, it makes a delicious meal of summer and early fall

#9 - Russula cyanoxantha

Russula cyanoxantha

Russula cyanoxantha, commonly known as the charcoal burner, is a basidiomycete mushroom, distinguished from most other members of the Russula genus by the fact that its gills do not split, but are soft and flexible. It is one of the most common species of Russula in Europe. Suitable for many kinds of preparation; the flesh is not as hard as that of many other edible Russulas. It has a mild, nutty taste.

#10 - Matsutake

Matsutake
Matsutake
#10 - Matsutake: More photos
Matsutake

Matsutake is the common name for a highly sought after mycorrhizal mushroom that grows in Asia, Europe, and North America. It is prized by the Japanese for its distinct spicy-aromatic odor.
Matsutake are hard to find, though simple to harvest, and, therefore, the price is very high. Domestic production of matsutake in Japan has been sharply reduced over the last 50 years due to a pine nematode.

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